The Kamikaze

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The Kamikaze strikes fear in a pole teacher’s heart. The Kamikaze appears unconcerned by the concept of gravity. The Kamikaze has no regard to the fundamental rule of pole: that failure to have the pole wedged firmly into some crevice of your body will mean that you will likely plunge to the ground.

The Kamikaze will nod and agree while the teacher gives firm, clear instructions on how to avoid falling off the pole when attempting a new move. Then, once the teacher steps away, the Kamikaze throws herself gleefully and with reckless abandon at the pole, caring not for her own safety nor that of innocent bystanders.

Fortunately, Kamikaze pole students also seem to be blessed with an uncanny knack for somehow managing to save themselves from face-planting at the last minute. And so they live to Kamikaze pole dance another day.These students are what Public Liability Insurance was invented for.

Tip: Try to avoid giving your teacher a heart attack by always having at least one arm or leg on the pole at a time.

Thank you to the LOVELY and AMAZING Michelle Shimmy for this awesome blog post!
http://shimmypolediary.blogspot.com.au/2012/06/pop-pole-quiz-what-kind-of-pole-student.html

Shop for other Limited Edition PDA prints in the shop
Text copyrighted by Michelle Shimmy

The Motor Skills Challenged Student

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This student is not the boss of her own body. In fact, it seems that her body has a mind of its own, and she has little to no control over what her body will do next. In her brain, she understands that she needs to hook her right leg around the pole, but something happens to the brain signals as they travel from her head to her leg, and she ends up grasping desperately at the pole with her left arm instead. She is capable of unintentionally tying herself into such complex knots around the pole that she needs someone to help unravel her.
The Motor Skills Challenged Student is often unable to distinguish left from right. To overcome this difficulty, the teacher might consider writing a big ‘R’ and ‘L’ on the Motor Skills Challenged Student’s hands (careful not to let her do it herself, or, if she does, make sure you check that she got it the right way around).
This student also has difficulty working out which way is forwards and backwards, up and down, and inside and outside. In my experience, the best way to help the Motor Skills Challenged Student is to physically manipulate her into the desired position, and then tell her to try to memorise how the position feels. A plus side can be that sometimes in her confusion the Motor Skills Challenged Student will accidentally create a new and interesting combo – and a good teacher will pay close attention to what this student is doing, because the Motor Skills Challenged Student is unlikely to be able to replicate it once she’s disentangled herself from the pole.
Tip: You’ll get there! It will get easier as your muscle memory develops 🙂

Thank you to the LOVELY and AMAZING Michelle Shimmy for this awesome blog post!
http://shimmypolediary.blogspot.com.au/2012/06/pop-pole-quiz-what-kind-of-pole-student.html

Shop for other Limited Edition PDA prints in the shop
Text copyrighted by Michelle Shimmy

The "I Can’t" Student

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This student is firmly convinced that there is something fundamentally different about her body, and believes that the difference makes her physically incapable of certain moves. This belief usually stems from an off-hand comment some doctor or physio made to her a few years ago, which the I Can’t Student has taken to heart as gospel. Something like “you know, your hip flexors are tighter than most peoples.” As a result, the I Can’t Student refuses to accept that anything can be done to change her destiny as the Girl With The Tight Hip Flexors.

As her teacher approaches her, the I Can’t Student will grip the pole and say firmly, “I can’t do this move.” Even if she hasn’t even tried it yet. However, with gentle and patient persuasion, the I Can’t Student can usually be convinced that she should try at least to refrain from saying “I can’t do this move,” in favour of saying, “I can’t do this move… YET.”

Tip: Stay positive – don’t create limitations for yourself 🙂

Thank you to the LOVELY and AMAZING Michelle Shimmy for this awesome blog post!
http://shimmypolediary.blogspot.com.au/2012/06/pop-pole-quiz-what-kind-of-pole-student.html

Shop for other Limited Edition PDA prints in the shop
Text copyrighted by Michelle Shimmy